Evening Primrose Oil, 1000 mg, 60 Softgels
Evening Primrose Oil, 1000 mg, 60 Softgels Evening Primrose Oil, 1000 mg, 60 Softgels Evening Primrose Oil, 1000 mg, 60 Softgels Evening Primrose Oil, 1000 mg, 60 Softgels Evening Primrose Oil, 1000 mg, 60 Softgels Evening Primrose Oil, 1000 mg, 60 Softgels

Evening Primrose Oil, 1000 mg, 60 Softgels

Our Price: $ 11.95
MSRP: $ 19.95

Evening Primrose Supplement may help with:
Womens Health Immune Support
improve skin moisture and transepidermal water loss
Formulated by Ray Sahelian, MD
Please click on the Description for more details....

Evening Primrose oil supplement

  • Women's Health Immune Support

Evening Primrose oil is a Dietary Supplement available over the counter.

Composition, what's in it?
This Evening Primrose oil supplement product consists of 100% pure, cold pressed oil of Evening Primrose (Oenothera lamarchiana), a potent source of Gamma Linolenic Acid (GLA), an omega 6 fatty acid produced in human metabolism. This evening primrose oil product is 100% pure, solvent free, cold pressed and without hexane and other solvent residues.

Suggested Use, how much to take:
As a dietary supplement, take one to four softgels in the morning on an empty stomach or as recommended by your health care provider.

Adverse reacations
Little has been published regarding the side effects of EPO. See the latest review and studies regarding Evening Primrose oil side effects.

Updated: December 12 2016

Supplement Facts
Serving Size: 1 Softgel
Servings Per Bottle: 60 Softgels
Amount Per Capsule % Daily Value
Calories
10
Total Fat 1 g
2%
Calories from Fat
10
Polyunsaturated Fat
1 g
*
Evening Primrose Oil
1000 mg
Cis-Linoleic Acid (LA)
730 mg
Gamma-Linolenic Acid (GLA)
99 mg
†Daily Value or Recommended Daily Intake Not Established
Other Ingredients : Gelatin, and Vegetable Glycerin.

Research review, caution
Int J STD AIDS. 2016. Dietary supplement interactions with antiretrovirals: a systematic review. Many patients who take antiretroviral drugs also take alternative therapies including dietary supplements. Some drug-supplement combinations may result in clinically meaningful interactions. We aimed to investigate the evidence for dietary supplement interactions with antiretrovirals. A systematic review was conducted using multiple resources including PubMed, Natural Medicine Comprehensive Database, The Review of Natural Products, and Google Scholar. All human studies or case reports evaluating an interaction between a dietary supplement and an antiretroviral were selected for inclusion. Calcium carbonate, ferrous fumarate, some forms of ginkgo, some forms of garlic, some forms of milk thistle, St. John's wort, vitamin C, zinc sulfate, and multivitamins were all found to significantly decrease the levels of selected antiretrovirals and should be avoided in patients taking these antiretrovirals. Cat's claw and evening primrose oil were found to significantly increase the levels of antiretrovirals and patients should be monitored for adverse effects while taking these dietary supplements with antiretrovirals. This systematic review shows the importance of screening all human immunodeficiency virus patients for dietary supplement use to prevent treatment failure or adverse effects related to an interaction.

Research review, caution
Int J STD AIDS. 2016. Dietary supplement interactions with antiretrovirals: a systematic review. Many patients who take antiretroviral drugs also take alternative therapies including dietary supplements. Some drug-supplement combinations may result in clinically meaningful interactions. We aimed to investigate the evidence for dietary supplement interactions with antiretrovirals. A systematic review was conducted using multiple resources including PubMed, Natural Medicine Comprehensive Database, The Review of Natural Products, and Google Scholar. All human studies or case reports evaluating an interaction between a dietary supplement and an antiretroviral were selected for inclusion. Calcium carbonate, ferrous fumarate, some forms of ginkgo, some forms of garlic, some forms of milk thistle, St. John's wort, vitamin C, zinc sulfate, and multivitamins were all found to significantly decrease the levels of selected antiretrovirals and should be avoided in patients taking these antiretrovirals. Cat's claw and evening primrose oil were found to significantly increase the levels of antiretrovirals and patients should be monitored for adverse effects while taking these dietary supplements with antiretrovirals. This systematic review shows the importance of screening all human immunodeficiency virus patients for dietary supplement use to prevent treatment failure or adverse effects related to an interaction.